3 ingredient dairy-free ice-cream

3 INGREDIENTS | VEGAN | GLUTEN-FREE | DAIRY-FREE | NUT-FREE | CHILD FRIENDLY | NO ADDED CANE SUGAR | LOW FRUCTOSE

I made this “nice-cream” or vegan ice-cream or whatever you choose to call it because I have been getting mighty bored of the whinging of “Whats for afternoon teeeeeeea?” the whole walk home from school! You could add any supplements you enjoy to pimp the nutrient content.

250g frozen mixed berries

150g coconut yoghurt

100g coconut water

Blend until you reach desired consistency – I use the Thermomix on speed 5 for about 20 seconds

Enjoy immediately or pour into a reusable glass container & pop in the freezer

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broccolini & sweet potato quiche

I loved making a simple quiche, but I never seem to have the same ingredients in the pantry so it is different each time. This is also the first time I’ve prepped in the Thermomix.

CRUST
1 cup almond meal
1/3 cup coconut flour
1 organic egg
1/3 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons white chia seeds
1 tablespoon thyme (can replace with parsley or rosemary)

  1. Turn the oven to 170 degrees celsius
  2. Blend all ingredients on reverse speed 3 for 10 seconds
  3. Put in a pie tin & set a timer for 15 minutes

FILLING
3 stalks (approx 130g) broccolini
1/2 small (approx 85g) sweet potato
6 organic eggs (aprox 340g)

  1. While the pie crust is cooking, throw broccolini & sweet potato in the Thermomix for 10 seconds on speed 4
  2. Add in the eggs & put on reverse speed 3 for 5 seconds
  3. When you remove the pie crust from the oven, turn the oven temperature up to 180 degrees
  4. Slowly tip the egg & vegetable mixture into the pie tin. Set the timer for 25 minutes.

 

Can you buy healthy foods at the supermarket?

Cost is our biggest prohibition when it comes to healthy eating. let’s face it, not everyone has $50 to spend on a protein powder, or “wellness elixir”. As I am on maternity leave, I spend (too much) time trawling supermarket aisles, looking for not only the healthiest products, but also ones that won’t send you broke. I make a list every week of what I “want” – not all items are essential & often I’ll check out a couple of stores before making an informed decision.

Woolworths – I know a lot of people are anti supermarkets but if we all spend our “supermarket dollars” on healthier products guess what they’re going to produce more of & drive prices down on? That’s right. My top 5 favourite products are:

  1. Macro organic coffee – I buy it ground & make a small pot of coffee every morning. At $6 for a packet, which lasts me over a week, it’s a lot more economical than buying your coffee, plus no nasty disposable coffee cups
  2. Macro organic peanut butter ($6.50 for 500g) – the only negative thing is that it does come in a plastic container – if you’re listening Woolworths, please change to glass 🙂
  3. Macro organic hulled tahini – I add it to home made chocolate so we go through quite a lot (oops!)
  4. Macro organic Dijon mustard – it is my favourite mustard & less than $4 per jar. What’s not to love?!
  5. Macro organic berries – my kids absolute favourite snack, they eat them by the bowl for afternoon tea or dessert. They are normally $7 per packet but keep your eyes peeled as they’ve been half price recently so $3.50 a packet is extremely good value. On a side note: Woolworths Double Bay – you’ve suddenly discontinued the Macro organic berries. Bring them back! They’re a staple in our home.

Some other noteworthy products which I find good value: Coolibah Organics Kale, Organic salad mix, organic eggs (about $8 a carton), organic meat (if you choose to eat meat).

Aldi – I need to focus on my list in Aldi as it is very easy to get sidelined by the deals! 99% of the time it’s not something I need, especially this year as we embrace minimalism as a family.  My top 5 purchases in Aldi are:

  1. Gluten free pasta: made from 2 simple ingredients – corn flour & rice flour
  2. Organic salted butter. Aldi, hello, if you’re listening, can you please bring back the unsalted too?! I don’t personally like butter but my sons do so I won’t compromise on quality.
  3. Organic milk – we go through a couple of litres every week (I don’t personally drink milk)
  4. Organic natural yoghurt – we use this in muffin recipes & my sons like it with some berries, vanilla powder & cinnamon. Just look out as the flavoured organic yoghurts look healthy (simple branding) but even the vanilla punches a massive 15% sugar.
  5. Organic pasta sauce: this sauce does have some added sugar but with a total of 6% sugar, I am ok with a small amount of this whether on its’ own, in a Puttanesca; or in the boys bolognaise

Other noteworthy deals: organic coconut oil & organic beef mince. Aldi, if you see this post, please start selling more organic meat for those who choose to consume meat.

I’d love to hear about what you’ve found in the supermarket that’s both healthy; & inexpensive. Come say hi over on Facebook or Instagram – 6 Clean Ingredients. Until then, wishing you abundant health & happiness, with a bit of fun on the side

Alice

Kale, carrot & quinoa salad 

VEGAN | GLUTEN-FREE | DAIRY-FREE
Can be made nut-free / option of adding dairy or seafood

I could not get enough of this delicious salad. It’s one of those “what have I got in the fridge/pantry” combos after 2 long days of fun but exhausting family events….ah Christmas, I love you but I’m tired now….

2/3 cup quinoa (when uncooked)
2 medium carrots, grated
2 stalks kale, the leaf pulled off the stem
1 tspn nutritional yeast
1 tspn cumin
1 tspn chilli flakes
1/4 cup almonds
1 tbspn black & white sesame seed mix
1 avo, could be replaced with 2 soft boiled organic eggs, smoked trout, feta or a salmon fillet

METHOD

  1. Cook 2/3 cup quinoa w 1 2/3 cup water
  2. Grate carrots
  3. Pull kale leaves off stem, wash, then chop finely & massage w 2 teaspoons olive oil & the sumac until it is a bit brighter green & doesn’t feel so rough.
  4. Throw almonds in the oven for 10 minutes at 140 degrees Celsius with a touch of olive oil & a sprinkle of chilli
  5. Once the quinoa is cooked, remove from heat. Once it has cooled down, stir through cumin, nutritional yeast,  carrots & kale.
  6. Tip onto a serving platter. Top with avo, sesame seeds & roast almonds

EASY PEASY QUIN-A-WEEZY

Vegan vs plant based 

Let me start by saying I have not eaten meat in almost 19 years (over half my life). I eat seafood 3-6 times a month. A year ago I cut out dairy on the advice of a Naturopath & introduced organic eggs (after never really enjoying eggs previously). I am 85-90% vegan.

I feed my children organic beef, lamb, chicken & sustainable fish. I occasionally buy nitrate-free ham for them. Quality is extremely important to me & I am always willing to pay more for this. They have some non-organic meat (such as when we go to sushi or they get a bacon & egg roll at the Farmer’s Market). They also consume dairy – I ONLY give them organic milk & organic butter. As a side story, I bought my sons a different organic milk a few weeks ago & they refused it, saying they would only drink “the one with the green lid”. If they said they no longer wanted to eat meat, or consume dairy, I would support them but get the advice from a health professional as to what substitutions they may require.

Everyone could benefit from eating less meat.

I am stereotyping here but I don’t believe the extreme approach of some vegans is beneficial & actually encourages people away from a more vegan/vegetarian/plant-based diet. In fact, some omnivores just end up picking fights because of the inability of some vegans to see any different. Ironically a lot of the vegans I follow on Instagram, grew up eating meat & animal products; yet cannot see beyond being a strict vegan, despite having previously led this lifestyle. Let’s assist omnivores by showing them what amazing vegan combinations can work so well to create a delicious salad / curry / roast / soup. Invite your omnivore friends over & present them with a vegan meal & see if they think something is missing. Ask them to consciously write a food diary to see how many times they consume meat a week. Or like a brilliant lecture I watched in my IIN study, commit to being a vegan for certain time frames-  eg this lecturer committed to being “vegan til 6pm” every day, which he had committed to for over 5 years. That meant a plant-based breakfast & lunch, then when he came home for dinner, he could choose a vegan meal, but also wouldn’t feel guilty for consuming good quality meat.

Let’s work as a team – we know there are environmental benefits to consuming vegetables over meat such as what is needed in terms of water/food/land/antibiotics/cost to make an animal from birth to plate. We also know that many people can thrive on a vegetarian diet (although there aren’t as many lifetime vegans). We need to factor in bio-individuality, & what one person can thrive on, others can’t. There are some beautiful role models like @thebalancedblonde who was vegan, then admitted the lifestyle didn’t work for her & of course polarised opinions (I say you go girl & you have every right to eat what your body thrives on). Also @onehungrymami – who was raw vegan a while, then vegan with the odd egg thrown in (again, good on you for being you & your transparency). There is another babe whose name I’m annoyed I can’t currently recall who is predominately plant based but recently posted an image accompanied with a caption about the smell of the roast/bacon in her house. Instant outrage & vitriol was spewed by the ‘loving’ vegan followers. What about the fact this awesome human supports a vegan diet 95% of the time? Does that really not count for anything? I support vegans, vegetarians, pescetarians & omnivores. Not everyone thrives on a vegan lifestyle. Some people try diets including Paleo, eating for their blood type & Ayurveda, but the only thing that can really teach you what you will thrive on is trial & error. I dine out with friends & family, & am not offended by them eating meat. I am encouraging my Mum to try bone broth to assist in recovery from knee surgery. Ironically, vegans are not always the healthiest of people, with many enjoying a high-fructose diet; & monomeals of particular fruits. There is also debate over how healthy soy products are, with many experts encouraging us to avoid them.

I would like to encourage those who follow an omnivore diet to try at least 14 out of 21 meals per week to be plant-based. Part of why I post the food I enjoy is to show how easy this can be. I am not the type to eat 50 bananas a day, I don’t have a diet high in fructose, I don’t like potatoes or pasta.

So what do I eat?
I eat organic gluten-free bread because it makes me feel better than gluten-based bread (my absolute favourite is Naturis buckwheat bread).
In winter I love to make a buckwheat ‘porridge’ with apple, berries & of course, a big dollop of almond butter.
I eat nuts or nut butters, & seeds – almost every meal I have has sesame, pumpkin or sunflower seeds sprinkled over the top for a little protein hit.
I enjoy whole fruits – current favourites are strawberries & pink grapefruit (obsessed), as well as the occasional whole apple (usually slathered with peanut butter) & oranges (which were brilliant for morning sickness)
I love vegetables – sweet potato is a staple (we go through about 4 a week), I love lettuce, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, pumpkin, celeriac, tomatoes, avocadoes, cucumber, beetroots, snow peas, eggplant, parsnip. I use tons of herbs & spices to add flavour – ginger, thyme, basil, parsley, mint, coriander, cumin. I can’t tolerate onion or garlic.
I have legumes a couple of times a month – in a chickpea fritter, or a curry.
I use a lot of olive oil (perhaps too much), & love organic mustard & apple cider vinegar, as well as salt, pepper & chilli to season.
I make my own chocolate from cacao butter, cacao, tahini with either stevia or rice malt syrup as a low-fructose sweetener.
I make my own muffins using usually a nut-based ‘flour’, carrots, banana, berries sometimes apples & do add organic eggs to them.
Sushi is a treat which I enjoy & I almost always have some form of seafood – tuna, salmon, prawns; but also happily enjoy avocado & veggie-based sushi. I don’t eat the soy sauce!
I don’t eat soy-based products often, but used to drink soy milk in my coffee from 2008-2015. I don’t eat store bought sweets or cakes but used to LOVE both & indulge regularly in my sweet tooth – like eating a whole pack of sweets on the way home from work.

We are fortunate that there is a growing community of vegan restaurants & nowadays the word ‘vegan’ is not just associated with tie-dye t-shirts, the smell of incense & dreadlocks. Being vegan is cool. It shows you care about your own health; but also the environment. Check out Sadhana Kitchen, Earth to Table, Nalini’s in Bondi Junction or many of the ‘healthy cafes’ like Paleo Cafe, Bondi Wholefoods & Henley’s Wholefoods, have vegan options.

I am not trying to spark debate here, as a predominately plant based person (I don’t want to label myself as vegan as I am not 100% vegan), I agree that steering towards plant-based is the way of the future. Let’s build people up, educate & help them be more imaginative about eating more vegan meals, not tear them down for doing things that many vegans used to do themselves….

I welcome your feedback.
Peas, love & healthiness xxx Alice

vegan pesto | GF DF

There aren’t many things better than pesto….I used some lovely organic parsley (from Wholefoods House) & freshly picked basil from our garden for a fresh, sour, salty & rich versatile sauce / dressing / dip.

It’s vegan, gluten-free, dairy-free, sugar-free, grain-free.

INGREDIENTS
2 cups parsley & basil, total
1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (I use an organic one from Naked Foods)
2 tablespoons pine nuts
juice of half a lemon (you may not need all of it)
zest of half a lemon
2 tablespoons olive oil
OPTIONAL – to taste – chilli flakes & salt

METHOD
1.
Throw all ingredients into the blender plus a pinch of salt BUT NOT the lemon juice & olive oil
2. Slowly pour the olive oil in
3. Slowly pour HALF the lemon juice in, then when well combined, taste to see if you want to add more sourness
4. Tip into a bowl – it will make about 1/3 of a cup – perfect to dip sweet potato wedges in, in my opinion

I love your feedback – leave a comment, a like, or come say hi on Facebook or Instagram.
I hope you’ve all had a lovely weekend, filled with most of your primary food – relationships, physical activity & spirituality. Plenty of time for the fourth element (career) tomorrow 🙂

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